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H.Om.E Project

H.Om.E xCoAx 2024

Abstract

H.Om.E. stood for Heritage, the Sanskrit word ॐ. and Earthship. Through three distinct cultural domains in Chile, Atayal, and Tibet, we aim to create parallel and non-linear historical axes. We seek to establish connections in the realms of astronomy, textiles, architecture, and data, with the goal of generating a unified narrative. We aspire to replace world history with a science fiction-inspired planetary history, engaging in discussions about modernity and the concept of a true homeland.
Through data visualization and dehumanization of historical archives, we aim to free cultural archives from the constraints of power and empowerment contexts. We seek to deconstruct binary oppositions such as human/non-human, returning them to historical contexts. Additionally, we explore the use of algorithmic mechanisms as a writing style to automate cultural archives and endow it self-awareness examine the potential for self-growth along with its underlying significance.
Currently, this research project is ongoing, and this introductory document provides an overview of the current progress in our investigative work and summarizes the methods we are currently exploring.

Why automate heritage data and give it its own consciousness?

  1. Dehumanizing heritage data allows for decentralization, avoiding the reshaping of thinking centered around “human” as the focal point of power and discourse.
  2. Creating a fictional automated machine can be an artistic means to connect three discontinuous cultural entities, establishing a nonlinear historical narrative to counteract the imperialistic and nationalistic narratives spread through the writing of regional art history.
  3. It challenges dominant paradigms in existing heritage preservation and art history writing fields, transforming the ways in which historical practices are carried out and redesigning them from within. Critical fabulation serves as a way to tell stories that awaken alternative histories.
  4. Designing an automated computational system using human heritage data as its computational language is a minimal approach to engaging in consciousness science discussions within the context of algorithms.

Possible Theoretical Supports for the Study

Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative

William Cronon mentions that “environmental historians need to combine traditional historical research with methods from ecology, economics, anthropology, and other disciplines...” In his work “Nature’s Metropolis,” he proposes viewing capitalism as the “second nature,” in contrast to the original “first nature” that encompasses all living things. He advocates telling urban and rural stories as a unified narrative; “nature” and “wilderness” are seen as one, and the relationship between humans and the wilderness is not in sharp opposition. Instead, the real home of humanity is the wilderness, with agriculture playing a significant role. Cronon also attempts to explore new ways of coexistence between humans and nature by redefining the concepts of wilderness and nature. He believes that the continuous dynamic adjustment of the boundaries between nature and wilderness is crucial for contemporary policy modifications. “When we describe human activities in an ecosystem, we always seem to be telling stories about them. Like all historians, we configure past events in a causal sequence—that is, a story—to give these events order and simplicity, so as to impart new meaning to them. We do this because storytelling is the main literary form attempting to seek meaning in an extremely chaotic and disorderly chronological reality.” We need to philosophically consider the significance of this collaboration; there are several purposes for bringing together ancestral civilizations from various countries for design cooperation: first, to reconstruct history similar to architecture, and second, to discuss origin issues and contemplate the future. “When we describe human activities in an ecosystem, we always seem to be telling stories about them. Like all historians, we arrange past events in a cause-and-effect sequence— a story—so that these events become orderly and simple, acquiring new meaning. We do this because narration is the primary literary form attempting to find meaning in an extremely chaotic and disorderly chronological reality.” We need to philosophically consider the significance of this collaboration; bringing together ancestral civilizations from various countries for design cooperation serves several purposes: first, a reconstruction of history similar to architecture; second, a discussion of origin issues and contemplation of the future.

Big History

Big History is a research methodology that retrospectively examines the past using various length scales, representing a decentralized historical perspective. Big History opposes specialization and seeks universal patterns or trends. It employs a multidisciplinary approach spanning the sciences and humanities to explore human existence within this larger context, integrating studies of the universe, Earth, and life. In David Christian’s work “Big History,” he defines it as dealing with “long durations.” Throughout human societies, people have consistently attempted to answer questions such as “Who am I? Where do I come from? What is the whole to which I belong?” Answers to these questions are often embedded in various creation myths. This project aims to generate a comprehensive and broad historical awareness from the scales of astronomy, textile archaeology, religion, and material science. This approach intends to measure our position, and due to the computability of data, provides convertibility to worldviews and ecologies, even if currently, this is merely an intuitive sensation.

Critical Fabulations

Daniela Rosner proposes redefining design as investigative and activist, personal and culturally situated, responsive and responsible. Challenging the field’s dominant paradigms and reinterpreting its history, Rosner wants to change the way we historicize the practice, reworking it from the inside. Focusing on the development of computational systems, she takes on powerful narratives of innovation and technology shaped by the professional expertise that has become integral to the field’s mounting status within the new industrial economy. To do so, she intervenes in legacies of design, expanding what is considered “design” to include long-silenced narratives of practice, and enhancing existing design methodologies based on these rediscovered inheritances. Drawing on discourses of feminist technoscience, she examines craftwork’s contributions to computing innovation—how craftwork becomes hardware manufacturing, and how hardware manufacturing becomes craftwork. She reclaims, for example, NASA’s “Little Old Ladies,” the women who built information storage for the Apollo missions by weaving wires through magnetized metal rings.

Mixing history, theory, personal experience, and case studies, Rosner reweaves fibers of technoscience by slowly reworking the methods and margins of design. She suggests critical fabulations as ways of telling stories that awaken alternative histories, and offers a set of techniques and orientations for fabulating its future. Critical Fabulations shows how design’s hidden inheritances open different possibilities for practice.

Myth of automation

Algorithms and data in models and ledgers enact an old fantasy of a future governed by rituals that become instruments, machines, and infrastructures. It is a fantasy of time control and automation that work as a deus ex machina or devil’s bridge, offering miracles that turn into curses. Examples go back to the ‘predictive analytics’ with olive presses in the 6th century BCE, the complaints about the merciless water clock in the 4th century BCE, and Plautus’ famous curse of the sundial (Chapter 2). These classic loci show how the fantasies of automation and control over time quickly turn into anxieties about bias, precarity, loss of agency, and sovereignty. Dreams and fears of automation emerge with every new instrument and infrastructure. From the early calendars and clocks to today’s reputation and scoring systems, predictive AI, or smart contracts on trustless blockchain ledgers, automation promises a frictionless, evidence-based, and politically neutral future and governance. In the present, the control of time and the future even intensified thanks to the computer clocks that do not measure but generate the signals and cycles needed to synchronize the data on the computers and networks and, by proxy, all the processes in society. The pervasive control of time through algorithms and associated bureaucratic structures, such as standards, further erodes the experience of time as an agency to discover, decide, disrupt, or negotiate the future with others. We will discuss this form of control and the ideal of governance as a myth of automation.

References of designing the mechanism of the automation

Nous n’avons jamais été modernes

2.1 The Modem Constitution
Modernity is often defined in terms of humanism, either as a way of saluting the birth of ‘man’ or as a way of announcing his death. But this habit itself is modern, because it remains asymmetrical. It overlooks the simultaneous birth of ‘nonhumanity’ -things, or objects, or beasts -and the equally strange beginning of a crossed-out God, relegated to the sidelines. Modernity arises first from the conjoined creation of those three entities, and then from the masking of the conjoined birth and the separate treatment of the three communities while, underneath, hybrids continue to multiply as an effect of this separate treatment. The double separation is what we have to reconstruct: the separation between humans and nonhumans on the one hand, and between what happens ‘above’ and what happens ‘below’ on the other.

These separations could be compared to the division that distinguishes the judiciary from the executive branch of a government. This division is powerless to account for the multiple links, the intersecting influences, the continual negotiations between judges and politicians. Yet it would be a mistake to deny the effectiveness of the separation. The modern divide between the natural world and the social world has the same constitutional character, with one difference: up to now, no one has taken on the task of studying scientists and politicians in tandem, since no central vantage point has seemed to exist. In one sense, the fundamental articles of faith pertaining to the double separation have been so well drawn up that this separation has been viewed as a double ontological distinction. As soon as one outlines the symmetrical space and thereby reestablishes the common understanding that organizes the separation of natural and political powers, one ceases to be modern. The common text that defines this understanding and this separation is called a constitution, as when we talk about amendments to the American constitution. Who is drafting such a text? For political constitutions, the task falls to jurists and Founding Fathers, but so far they have done only a third of the work, since they have left out both scientific power and the work of hybrids. For the nature of things, it is the scientists’ task, but they have done only another third of the work, since they have pretended to forget about political power, and they have denied that hybrids have any role to play even as they multiply them. For the work of translation, writing the constitution is the task of those who study those strange networks that I have outlined above, but science students have fulfilled only half of their contract, since they do not explain the work of purification that is carried out above them and accounts for the proliferation of hybrids.

Who is to write the full constitution? As far as foreign collectives are concerned, anthropology has been pretty good at tackling everything at once. In fact, as we have seen, every ethnologist is capable of including within a single monograph the definition of the forces in play; the distribution of powers among human beings, gods, and nonhumans; the procedures for reaching agreements; the connections between religion and power; ancestors; cosmology; property rights; plant and animal taxonomies. The ethnologist will certainly not write three separate books: one dealing with knowledge, another with power, yet another with practices. She will write a single book, like the magnificent one in which Philippe Descola attempts to sum up the constitution of the Achuar of the Amazon region (Descola, 1986 1993):

Yet the Achuar have not completely subdued nature by the symbolic networks of domesticity. Granted, the cultural sphere is all-encompassing, since in it we find animals, plants and spirits which other Amerindian societies place in the realm of nature. The Achuar do not, therefore, share this antinomy between two closed and irremediably opposed worlds: the cultural world of human society and the natural world of animal society. And yet there is nevertheless a certain point at which the continuum of sociability breaks down, yielding to a wild world inexorably foreign to humans. Incomparably smaller than the realm of culture, this little piece of nature includes the set of things with which communication cannot be established. Opposite beings endowed with language aents, of which humans are the most perfect incarnation, stand those things deprived of speech that inhabit parallel, inaccessible worlds. The inability to communi cate is often ascribed to a lack of soul wakan that affects certain living species: most insects and fish, poultry, and numerous plants, which thus lead a mechanical, inconsequential existence. But the absence of communi cation is sometimes due to distance: the souls of stars and meteors, infinitely far away and prodigiously mobile, remain deaf to human words.

Integrated Information Theory

Integrated information theory (IIT) attempts to identify the essential properties of consciousness (axioms) and, from there, infers the properties of physical systems that can account for it (postulates). Based on the postulates, it permits in principle to derive, for any particular system of elements in a state, whether it has consciousness, how much, and which particular experience it is having. IIT offers a parsimonious explanation for empirical evidence, makes testable predictions, and permits inferences and extrapolations.

Together, the axioms and postulates of IIT provide a principled way to determine whether a set of elements in a state specifies a conceptual structure and, if so, to characterize it in every aspect.The central identity proposed by IIT is then as follows: every experience is identical with a conceptual structure that is maximally irreducible intrinsically, also called “quale” sensu lato (note that the identity is between an experience and the conceptual structure specified by a set of elements in a state, not between an experience and its physical substrate - the elements as such). In other words, an experience is a “form” in cause-effect space. The quality of the experience—the way it feels due to its particular content of phenomenal distinctions—is completely specified by the form of the conceptual structure: the phenomenal distinctions are given by the concepts (qualia sensu stricto) and their relationship in cause-effect space. The quantity of the experience—the level to which it exists—is given by its irreducibility Φmax. The postulated identity between features of experiences and features of conceptual structures implies, for instance, that the breakdown of consciousness in sleep and anesthesia must correspond to a breakdown of conceptual structures; that the presence of distinct modalities and submodalities must correspond to distinct clusters of concepts in cause-effect space; that features that are bound phenomenologically (a blue book) must be bound in the conceptual structure, corresponding to irreducible higher-order concepts; that similar experiences must correspond to similar conceptual structures, and so on.

1. The international networked fieldworks in previous projects

_Three previous projects as the fieldworks_
These preliminary projects are the first step in connecting local ancestral backgrounds with modern technology, with the aim of further strengthening the connections between cultures through collaborative art creations that combine textiles, astronomy, and architectural knowledge of each culture. Building upon these previous efforts, the I_C project, for example, introduced methods to enhance ancient Inca constellation culture through the use of modern telescope data from ALMA, the Greenhouse Heart project proposed collaboration between highland agriculture and art, and the Tribe vs. Machine project facilitated initial collaboration between the Atayal weaving heritage and smart textiles.

1.1 Tribe Against Machine

Tribe Against Machine was a 10-days annual summer camp in Taiwan, organized by Lihan Workshop and its founder Yuma Taru in 2017 and 2018, the project founder is Shih Wei Chieh. It calls artists, hackers and activists to work with ancestral cultures materially and immersively. Workshops and fieldworks were the main tool for exchanging smart material and ethnic craft knowledge. For example, prototypes mixed with smart materials and indigenous culture were experimented from the collaborations between artists in the event, such as a replicant of Atayal bride headset installed with lilypad as wearable antenna, Atayal hunter cape made of bio-plastic and distant sensor. The participants were mainly from the weaver network of Yuma Taru and the e-textile communities internationally.

1.2 The Mind of A Greenhouse and Tashi Gatsen Charity School

The participation of Tibetan culture in the H.Om.E Project was due to a greenhouse project in 2018. The greenhouse project takes root in a charity initiative by the artist Shih Wei Chieh and the scientist Wiriya Rattanasuwan, who engaged with the Tashi Getsen Charity School founded by Tsangsar Kunga Renpoche and the local population of Nangqen the building of a greenhouse to provide food year-round for the orphan children sheltered by the school. The difficulty to feed all the students is particularly present in the winter time when temperatures can go down to -30°C. The greenhouse that will be conceived and built by the artist and the researcher is destined to resist cold weather and be efficient all year long. Thus, one of the first challenges of this project is to build an operative greenhouse to produce food in proper quantities and with good nutritive quality. From this root, we wish to grow different branches: a scientific research laboratory and an artistic program. The greenhouse thus turns into a ground for experimentation in different disciplines thanks to the implementation of various technologies. We hope to be able to collect weather and environmental data specific to a high altitude context, that will be communicated on a public internet platform, creating the first links of an open network between researchers of different fields. This is also an example for art to take place within the scope of social projects and agriculture.

1.3 I_C Project

The crossing of the wearable and the textile with new technologies, is a discipline that develops new areas of theoretical research about the functionality and symbolism of the wardrobe, and of the textile as such, which constantly generates technical and methodological rethinking in the field of creation and production of design, art and engineering, and that, through these new technologies, which can be merged with their traditional clothing, it is possible to reach or give rise to instances of transformation of the wearable and textile into a material and support with a new meaning, which expands it to extrasensory dimensions, that is, from this project, the textile connects with areas of human and non-human nature, since, through current astronomical data, the importance of our individual and collective relationship with the environment, all this addressed, for that matter, from Astronomy: a discipline that since ancient times has been a kind of object and metaobject that defines life and spaces for the various cultural developments from the textile, which leads to situations of dialogue between the subject, the communities and the environment, in order to recognize and meet the everyday world, so to install and / or approach types of artifacts that raise awareness, and that in turn, make us more vulnerable, since they could evidence the presence of mega environments (the universe, the stars, life outside planet Earth), that surround us and that urge us to look beyond what is available or encompassed, which is very necessary for the existence, life and study of consciousness (human and non-human).

2. The woven earthship and the big history genealogy

H.Om.E Project focuses on the relationship between textile construction and data to create visual patterns that can be used to build architectural elements. By linking textiles with architecture, this project demonstrates how various elements can intersect and consolidate into a structure capable of providing shelter and fulfilling the role of architecture.
Many potential applications for the field of textiles as architecture, in addition to the fact that it is still controversial due to the textile materiality, but it is a great element since its structure can inspire to generate architecture with endless creative plots. That is to say, the relationship between textile construction and architectural construction no longer seems very distant, both for being architecture and for covering interior and/or exterior spaces as complements to a more solid architecture. An architecture with solid materials could be greatly inspired by the structures of how a textile is made, that is, it is very important to know the type of textile making in order to generate new possible architectures, and if we add iconography to that : data of any kind, the more meaning this architecture can acquire: data collection in a volume generated from textile construction structures, which is interesting for futures and possible worlds of coexistence and relationships.
It is hard to imagine but it could be interesting both for future Architecture and for textiles and their relationship with the surroundings, an expansive, community relationship, which brings the future closer to a past from where the original peoples of the planet have always lived together, for example textiles and its preparation from a collaborative community and in constant action to transmit information and at the same time to live. Maria Jose Rios

William Cronon says: “When we describe human activities in an ecosystem, we always seem to be telling stories related to them. Like all historians, we arrange past events in a causal order, that is, stories, to make these events orderly and simple, and to give them new meanings. We do this because narrative is the primary literary form that seeks meaning in the extremely impermeable and chaotic annals of reality.”We need to approach the meaning of this collaboration philosophically; there are several purposes for designing cooperation among the ancestral civilizations from various countries: 1. Reconstructing history like architecture. 2. Discussing the issue of origins and contemplating the future.

Big History is a research method that uses various length scales to review the past. It is a dispersed historical perspective, and in David Christian’s work “Big History”, he defined it as “long duration”. Throughout all human societies, people have always tried to answer these questions: “Who am I? Where do I come from? What is the whole I belong to?” The answers are often embedded in various creation myths. Through collaboration with multiple fields in the H.Om.E project, the scope of the answers to this ancient question is limited to the maximum through data. A comprehensive and broad historical awareness is generated from the scale of astronomy, textile archaeology, religion, and material science, thereby measuring our position. Due to the operability of data, it seems that these worldviews or ecologies are endowed with convertibility, even if it is currently only an intuitive feeling: for example, exploring indigenous cultures is not just a reaction to colonialism or Western civilization, but a sampling or hacking of a certain time to enhance the above historical perspective. Shih Wei-Chieh

3. A technical investigation linking textile art and ecological architecture.

3.1 The atmosphere water harvesting

One of the most challnging aspects of this project is finding common ground in concepts and materials between fields such as ecology, textile heritage preservation, and ecological architecture, especially between textile art and textile architecture. Therefore, several techniques that are more likely to collaborate with architecture and textiles have been explored within the regions of the project collaborators.

There are a few methods of atmospheric water harvesting that can be used in the Atacama Desert. One approach is through the use of fog nets, which are large pieces of mesh or netting that capture droplets of water from fog. The nets are typically set up on hillsides or other areas where fog is likely to occur, and the captured water is then collected and stored. Fog harvesting has been successfully implemented in parts of Chile, including the Atacama Desert.Another approach is through the use of dew condensers, which are essentially large, flat surfaces that are designed to condense water vapor from the air overnight. The collected water is then collected and stored for later use. Dew condensers have been used in various parts of the world, including in Israel, and could potentially be used in the Atacama Desert as well. Both fog harvesting and dew condensation require the use of materials that are able to condense water vapor, such as mesh or special coatings. In addition, these methods may be limited by the amount of fog or dew that occurs in the region, and may not be able to provide a consistent supply of water. Nevertheless, atmospheric water harvesting remains a promising method for obtaining water in arid regions like the Atacama Desert. Atmospheric water harvesting is a process of collecting water from the air by condensing water vapor, and it can be an effective way to obtain water in areas with limited access to freshwater sources. The Atacama Desert is one such area, known for being one of the driest places on Earth.

There are a few methods of atmospheric water harvesting that can be used in the Atacama Desert. One approach is through the use of fog nets, which are large pieces of mesh or netting that capture droplets of water from fog. The nets are typically set up on hillsides or other areas where fog is likely to occur, and the captured water is then collected and stored. Fog harvesting has been successfully implemented in parts of Chile, including the Atacama Desert. Another approach is through the use of dew condensers, which are essentially large, flat surfaces that are designed to condense water vapor from the air overnight. The collected water is then collected and stored for later use. Dew condensers have been used in various parts of the world, including in Israel, and could potentially be used in the Atacama Desert as well. Both fog harvesting and dew condensation require the use of materials that are able to condense water vapor, such as mesh or special coatings. In addition, these methods may be limited by the amount of fog or dew that occurs in the region, and may not be able to provide a consistent supply of water. Nevertheless, atmospheric water harvesting remains a promising method for obtaining water in arid regions like the Atacama Desert.

In addition, under the scope of textile and material design, a study has also been conducted to enhance the collection efficiency of mist nets by charging mist nets made of stainless steel. The abstract of the paper is as follows:

“Fog collection can be a sustainable solution to water scarcity in many regions around the world. Most proposed collectors are meshes that rely on inertial collision for droplet capture and are inherently limited by aerodynamics. We propose a new approach in which we introduce electrical forces that can overcome aero- dynamic drag forces. Using an ion emitter, we introduce a space charge into the fog to impart a net charge to the incoming fog droplets and direct them toward a collector using an imposed electric field. We experimentally measure the collection efficiency on single wires, two-wire systems, and meshes and propose a physical model to quantify it. We identify the regimes of optimal collection and provide insights into designing effective fog harvesting systems. Fog collection can be a sustainable solution to water scarcity in many regions around the world. Most pro- posed collectors are meshes that rely on inertial collision for droplet capture and are inherently limited by aerodynamics. We propose a new approach in which we introduce electrical forces that can overcome aero- dynamic drag forces. Using an ion emitter, we introduce a space charge into the fog to impart a net charge to the incoming fog droplets and direct them toward a collector using an imposed electric field. We experimentally measure the collection efficiency on single wires, two-wire systems, and meshes and propose a physical model to quantify it. We identify the regimes of optimal collection and provide insights into designing effective fog harvesting systems.”

It is important to know that there have been many previous examples of combining this mist net technology with architecture or wearable devices, such as the Warka Water project in southern Ethiopia, the CloudFisher project in Morocco, and Sweden designer Pavels Hedström’s work Fog-X in Atacama Desert, among others. Moreover, the use of the behavior of the spiders or Stenocara gracilipes, which collects water from fog, has been mentioned as a design inspiration in these projects.

3.2 Manufacturing large dye sensitized solar cell glass at home laboratory

Dye-sensitized solar cells are an easy-to-manufacture and cheap photovoltaic device that can be made in a home studio. However, the conversion efficiency is still low, making it difficult to achieve commercial purposes. However, because the pattern and color of the titanium dioxide layer can be highly customized, and compared with the general products on the market, which are relatively small in size, household electric kilns can be used to make relatively large, highly artistic and photoelectric products. interactive objects. This article records the production method of the finished product with a size of 30 by 60 cm. The chemical slurry and dyes are all purchased from Great Cells Solar, so the relevant manufacturing process refers to the conventional practice. The key parts of this experiment are the control of the baking temperature of the large glass, the design of the vertical conduction series of the FTO glass, and the sustainability record of the finished product.

Solar power provides additional energy for atmospheric water collection technology and is a reasonable component of eco-architecture. Due to the customizable and semi-transparent nature of dye-sensitized solar cell electrodes, they also have artistic potential. Although research on dye-sensitized solar cells is no longer the focus of the solar energy field, they are still involved in front-end research in the field of agrivoltaics. For example, by using semi-transparent dye-sensitized solar cells to filter out light that plants do not need from sunlight and create colors that plants prefer, crop growth rates can be increased. Semi-transparent solar power does not take up agricultural land either.

This experiment does not use a solar simulator as a test light source, and only measures the output power under natural sunlight at noon. After the finished product is packaged, the open circuit voltage and open circuit current are measured to be about 5.8V, 51mA respectively. Because only six clips are used as temporary packaging, and the heat-pressing adhesive film is not used correctly to seal the two electrodes, the electrolyte is still in a volatilized state. The paste is isolated from the electrolyte, so within two hours after the electrolyte is injected, the interaction between the silver paste and the electrolyte, and the phenomenon that part of the silver paste is dissolved, but after the packaging and after After measuring the battery one month later, the output is still about 0.33 watts, and there is no significant decline in performance yet.

A pavilion made of glass and weaving
In practical applications, the use of solar glass, which can be patterned and has optical interaction, has potential for computation. The combination of solar glass and ropes may be a good sculpture solution. The design method is based on the previous work of Satoru Sughihara. The work was generated by Processing, where transparent acrylic sheets were laser-cut and connected by ropes to be suspended.

The algorithmic design in architecture refers to the use of computational methods and algorithms to generate and optimize architectural designs. This method involves writing code and using software tools to automate the design process, allowing architects to explore and evaluate a large number of design options quickly and efficiently. By using algorithmic design techniques, architects can create complex and innovative designs that are difficult to achieve using traditional design methods. Additionally, algorithmic design can help architects optimize designs for factors such as energy efficiency, structural integrity, and construction costs.

4. The mathematization process of the ecology

The followings are the proposals from the participants regarding the data application in project, which is expected to be included in the earthship design.

4.1 Process of Maria Jose Riòs

This project considers, in a fundamental way, to artistically explore the relationship between astronomy and the textile technique from its cultural value in traditional cultures, together with an exploration and action from new digital technologies for visualizing astronomical data, many of which are open in the ALMA Data Observatory, making it possible from the fabric made with tools and techniques that will allow: visualize and connect with these from the textile, which also gives room for a new possibility and support for data visualization, which will be based on the importance for our history and cultural identity, which from the millenary technique of loom weaving, remains in force until the present. today, but with certain current digital, analog and mechanical implementations.The loom is a type of tool that made possible an important creation of information media, roles and social and daily functions, a tool that is the basis of the history of computing (Jacquard Loom as the first binary system) and of machines of current manual and automatic weaving. A Norwegian mechanical-digital loom was used to weave the astronomical data, the result being 2 surfaces of 70 cm x 90 cm.

4.2 Process of Satoru Sugihara

To study the common essence of the textile patterns in Atayal culture and Mapuche culture and envision fictional co-evolution of the two, these imaginative computational patterns are generated by the following steps. Firstly, the eye textile pattern made of nested diamond shapes known in Atayal culture and the stepping zigzag pattern known as Andean symbol are picked. Then secondly, the algorithm to generate both patterns and also continuous transition between them is developed as a multiagent-based algorithm imagining as if those patterns are results of plants’ or creatures’ growth through time. The Atayal eye pattern also has a horizontal line symbol which represents the boundary between this world and the afterlife world where ancestors reside. This horizontal line symbol is also incorporated in the algorithm and the resulting patterns show self-organizing patterns of those symbols in the two cultures through continuously transitioning and yet distinctly discrete symbols and the distributed horizontal lines appear as if they suggest ubiquitous presence and close relationship to our ancestors.

4.3 Process of Shih Wei Chieh

Dye-sensitized solar cell is cheap and easy to produce at home. It’s semi-transparent and can be dyed with plant dyes. The electrodes can be patterned by silk screen technique. It is a light-sensitive interface relates to agrivoltaic field, which was used in a greenhouse project I participated in Tibet as a concept sculpture. Process documentation: Manufacturing of Large Dye Sensitized Solar Cell at home

5. References

  1. Latour, Bruno. 1993. We Have Never Been Modern. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
  2. Yuk Hui. “For a Planetary Thinking - Journal #114. n.d. Accessed December 22, 2023. https://www.e-flux.com/journal/114/366703/for-a-planetary-thinking/.
  3. Christian, David. 2004. Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History. University of California Press.
  4. Christian, David. 2005. “Bridging the Two Cultures: History, Big History, and Science.” Historically Speaking 6 (January): 21–26. https://doi.org/10.1353/hsp.2005.0085.
  5. “Mapping the Infinite: Cosmologies Across Cultures.” n.d. Accessed December 23, 2023. https://pst.art/en/exhibitions/cosmologies.
  6. Posch, Irene, and Ebru Kurbak. 2016. CRAFTED LOGIC Towards Hand-Crafting a Computer. https://doi.org/10.1145/2851581.2891101.
  7. Su Hsin-Tien 蘇新田. 2018. Chronological Chart of Taiwan Culture 臺灣文化年表. https://www.facebook.com/ntmofa/photos/a.494029957316891/1904508422935697/?paipv=0&eav=Afb7EYTBdX_I0OesiV3wNg5fkbpv1HLWmSJt2ZARrqrJrAUukRZORe4WHzTAogoWcnU&_rdr
  8. A Pioneering Journey in Historiography: Notes from 2022 Symposium on Reconstructing History of Art in Taiwan - “HorizontalArt History: Perspectives from Taiwan”, https://artouch.com/art-views/review/content-91913.html?fbclid=IwAR0cEJZckcZ2Pu-cyxElIfo_5VG5HYp1smkfq3ggeNiq3TNucb809zEOIlI_aem_
  9. Barichello, Jessica, Luigi Vesce, Paolo Mariani, Enrico Leonardi, Roberto Braglia, Aldo Di Carlo, Antonella Canini, and Andrea Reale. 2021. “Stable Semi-Transparent Dye-Sensitized Solar Modules and Panels for Greenhouse Application.” Energies 14 (October): 6393. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14196393.
  10. Damak, Maher, and Kripa Varanasi. 2018. “Electrostatically Driven Fog Collection Using Space Charge Injection.” Science Advances 4 (June): eaao5323. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aao5323.
  11. Marchitelli, Vito, Paolo Harabaglia, Claudia Troise, and Giuseppe De Natale. 2020. “On the Correlation between Solar Activity and Large Earthquakes Worldwide.” Scientific Reports 10 (1): 11495. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67860-3.

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